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In their own words: Who we were…and who we will become

Senior+Caroline+Donahue+addresses+WHS+at+Class+Day.+PHOTO%2FAnne+Donahue
Senior Caroline Donahue addresses WHS at Class Day. PHOTO/Anne Donahue

Senior Caroline Donahue addresses WHS at Class Day. PHOTO/Anne Donahue

Senior Caroline Donahue addresses WHS at Class Day. PHOTO/Anne Donahue


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Senior Caroline Donahue addresses WHS at Class Day. PHOTO/Anne Donahue

Special thanks to the seniors who submitted their own speeches.

Doug Dahl: Senior Assembly

What’s up everyone. First off I want to congratulate you all for making it through the gauntlet. Through every standardized test, through every analytical essay, and through every Korsunsky lunchtime napkin assault. I applaud you all for your bravery, virtue, and diligence. Standing up here I have come to the full realization that I am in no way qualified to give any of you any life advice, let alone an entire speech’s worth. I may not streak through Robotics classrooms anymore, but in complete honesty, I am the same exact person at heart, and so I think the best I can do is clue you in on some life secrets I’ve recently discovered for myself. Firstly: Apparently the saying mind over matter was not meant to be taken literally. Your head cannot in fact function as a sledgehammer. Or any other power tool surprisingly enough.  Secondly: The only thing six years of Latin qualifies you for is a job as a Latin teacher. Or a trip to ancient Rome. It, unfortunately, will not turn you into Percy Jackson despite all of our wildest hopes and dreams. Lastly and most importantly: Inciting a riot is a criminal offense. Can’t comment on an open investigation so I’m not gonna say anything more on that one. As you can clearly tell Mr. Davidson’s love for learning has inspired me on a scholarly path of my own. From worshipping Euclid as a freshman to finally coming out of Plato’s cave today, we’ve certainly come a long way.

Last time I was given access to a microphone, I did a spoken word rendition of a Marvin Gaye song. Personally, I have never felt better about myself. My teacher, on the other hand, looked as though he might pass a kidney stone from the discomfort. Sorry about that Mr. Kelley. And thank you for not speaking out against my ascension to the podium today. Some of my most vivid memories in high school came from the creative freedom I found in the open mic days of that class, but the first real clear memories I have from my time in Tony Parker’s domain are from my first school dance. Some might say we have taken a couple steps backward as a species after that first fateful function. Lord knows everyone’s reproductive fitness is going down the tubes, but I honestly am not clear enough on what actually happened to tell you if we’ve made any steps for mankind since then. I was just a scared baby elephant, in a herd of lions. I remember nothing but a rabid circle and all sorts of grunts and growls coming from the center. I remember the horrified look on my mentor Patrick Dandrea’s face, and the weary acceptance on the faces of all the other staff. I’ve never seen a group of adults so overwhelmed in my life. I still feel bad about that, not so much because I regret my actions but because I have enormous respect and admiration for a lot of the teachers here at Weston. In particular the English department. Every teacher I’ve had has been nothing but supportive in success and constructive in failure, and they’ve taught all of us how to get our points across clearly and intelligently, which is something of extreme value. It’s also not skill I ever imagined myself learning from a middle-aged man who acted like a bird sometimes more than a teacher. Mr. Banker jumping off a desk and screeching like an eagle to teach us the Odyssey is a memory that has forever been burned into every corner of my mind. The absolute confidence and fearlessness shocked me at the time, but are now things that I look to when trying to decide how to live my own life. Confidence is a trait that I think defines me as a person, but it wasn’t so much the display of that one characteristic in particular that was so inspiring. Mr. Banker let 100% of his personality be known to everyone around him. He set standards for himself as a teacher and a person ,and stuck to those standards without fail. He didn’t have anyone grading his work or giving him feedback, and yet he still managed to thrive and exceed my expectations, along with everyone else’s. This strong sense of self, an unwavering individuality, and unbending standards for himself are things that I hope beyond belief you all will have. Having been beside most of you since we were sproutlets in Country and Woodland schools together, I know all of you have something about you that can drive you to transcend any limits anyone else might try to place on you. When I talk to people, even in passing in the hallways, I catch glimpses of the greatness of people. I see people’s personalities shining through the dullness of a rainy Monday morning, and those interactions make me happier than I could possibly describe. When I walk away from those conversations, I realize that I’m smiling like an idiot, and I don’t care, because I feel like a part of something great. In many ways, it feels like we’ve never been more of a unified community. It feels like we’ve finally been brought together by years of indentured servitude. In many other ways, I’ve never seen such a similar group of people so divided. Some of you can’t wait to book it and kick off your grand life plans. Some of you are holding on dearly to these last few months of high school and innocence. And even more of you still fall in the middle, excited and nostalgic. I personally am part of this third group. Leaving behind a trail littered with Incredibles references and ripped dancing pants has forced me to give some thought to how I still want to impact Weston and all the old friends I have here, but it’s also made me unbelievably excited to see the trails we’re all going to blaze in a few months time. I know I’m not alone in these conflicted feelings. There are an incredible amount of experiences to be had in the next act of our lives. There is an equal amount of sacrifice to be made if we want to truly see and feel new things. It’s not just the calming constant of the high school routine we’re choosing to toss by the wayside, it’s the comfort of home, it’s the familiar love of our friends sitting here with us, and scariest of all, the version of ourselves that we have crafted for these past years. When we’re thrown into all of our unique and exciting new situations, we’re not going to have a lot of our old safety nets there to catch us. An important part of our lives is coming to a close. We’re going to need to make decisions about the person we want to become. But we’re prepared. This uncertainty is nothing new. The future has always been uncertain. And in this uncertainty, I know we can all find opportunities. Opportunities to love. Opportunities to grow. And opportunities to shatter every expectation that has ever weighed on our shoulders. Thank you, class of 2017, nothing but appreciation for everyone, see you all later

Caroline Donahue: 

Welcome parents, teachers, friends, family, and, of course, Class of 2017. Over the past four years at Weston High School, my classmates and I have studied hard for exams, crafted intricate projects, perfected our dance moves at all-school dances, and done our best to avoid the cafeteria food. We’ve had a lot of great experiences together as a class, but as I was thinking about what I might say today, I realized that perhaps one of the most important things we have done during these four years is create a community with the people around us. Today, it isn’t our GPA’s, our college acceptances – or rejections- or even our score in Kahoot that matters, it is the relationships we have nurtured and built with our teachers, parents, and classmates along the way.

        But high school wasn’t always this way. We had to build these relationships starting freshman year. We began with the teachers and adults inside the school walls. It was Damani who first introduced Tony the custodian to our class, and we are lucky he did. Whether Tony was dapping-up the boys in the hallway between classes, explaining one of his corny jokes to a lunch table full of kids, or telling us a story we were never quite sure was true or not, Tony was always lightening the mood and bringing laughter to our stressful schedules. And back in the days when open campus was still just a dream, it was Leanne our favorite lunch lady who never failed to make us feel a little less guilty when she told us to “Have a good day, honey” after we got our third slice of pizza.  And when we received our first-ever report cards and realized we were all failing res-tech, it was Mrs. Niel that took our minds off of it by talking to us about what the boys’ hockey team could do better.

        After two years of fostering these bonds inside the walls of the high school, we got our licenses and began to branch out and gather support from the surrounding community. Dana Dinardo and I found that iced coffees and long talks with Mark at the Linden Store, was a very productive way to spend our free periods—our parents didn’t agree. Others in our grade swore by dinner at the 99, better known as “the nines,” although invites to these boy’s dinners were very exclusive and Kayla Lucas is still the only girl to ever receive an invite – I’m still waiting on mine. Jared Groff ‘s friendship with the owners of Fehl’s Market began with his unusual lunchtime purchases – a single giant baguette that he munched on in-between bites of gummy bears (I’m still unsure how he’s as fit as he is…).

  The encouragement that we received from our relationships with faculty, the wider community, and our parents has helped push us through these past four years. The most important support, however, has come from one another. Over the past 13 years together, we have grown into a family of our own. We joke around like family; we’ve all seen Doug Dahl dropping it a little too low on the dance floor just trying to make those around him smile. We fight like family; shout-out to the sibling-like rivalries between couples like Jack De Jong and Luke Shea or Sydney Gosman and Izzy Laufer. We love like family; we’ve all felt uncomfortable around Jared and Ben White’s weirdly long hugs. But, above all, we sure as hell support each other like family; whether it’s staying to the end of the Thanksgiving football game, no matter the score, or attending all four performances of the Spring Musical.

        But this graduation ceremony marks the end of our high school careers. And some of you may be more than ready to move on to the next chapter in your life, or if you are like me, you might be more than happy to do a couple more years at 444 Wellesley Street. But, wherever next year takes you, whether it’s the college of your dreams or one you’re not quite sure of, travel, a gap year, or if you have a job lined up, I would like to offer you this: recall the beginning of high school and begin your journey forming relationships with those around you, just like we’ve been doing for the past four years. Find your Tony the custodian who makes you laugh, find your Mr. Burkus who cheers you on, and find new friends to hit the 99 with. And as you build these new communities, always remember your community here- Weston High School and the class of 2017. After all, we are a family, and you can always come home to family. So come back to the Thanksgiving football game, reconnect with a friend over an iced coffee at Linden, or reach out to an old teacher or coach and let them know how things are going and don’t you dare miss the 5th year reunion. We will always be connected by the memories we’ve created over these past four years together. So congratulations Class of 2017: I love you and thank you for being my family for the past four years.

Imani Daniel-Froston: Graduation

Seventeen, last name, first initial @my.weston.org – our permanent school email. Seventeen, plus 3 additional numbers – our permanent  lunch codes. Seventeen, Seventeen, Seventeen. “Why Seventeen?” I asked the lunch lady on my first day of kindergarten. “Why do we all have a 17 in the beginning of our lunch code?”. “2017 is your graduation year.” the lunch lady said, and walked away from a very confused kindergartner. By the time I fully understood what the year 2017 meant, it always felt like it was so far into the future and that it would never come.

They say time flies when you’re having fun and believe it or not, time flies when you go through high school as well. I’ve been attending Weston Public Schools since I was a preschooler, so yes I am a “lifer”, and I’ve watched the class of 2017 evolve over the past 14 years.

From the time of the infamous merge of the Country and Woodland kids at the Field school back in 2008, I knew that our grade was something special. In Field School, our grade traded, advertised and proudly carried around our silly bands, animal shaped erasers, and pencil grips. It was a serious business – and because we were more focused on trading than our work, it got banned. But that didn’t limit our grade from it’s unique qualities that would continue to grow as we got older.

Then came middle school. Lockers, Intramural sports, electives, a cafeteria with more diverse food! You’d think that the wacky trends stayed in the 5th grade, but they didn’t. Soon came the multi colored breast cancer supporting braclets  – banned. Then our strange fetish for hugging – banned. It seems like every time we found a new way to keep our curious yet immature minds entertained, it  got banned. In middle school,  we learned how to work with wood, program robots, design digital photography, dance, act, and most importantly how to play scrabble on our ipads in the middle of class, which too, eventually got banned.

Then came High School with more lockers (which no one uses by the way), more sports, and more electives.   But high school also came with NHD that nearly killed us all and the stress of IRP in 10th grade. As we moved onto the dreaded junior year and the pressure of SATs, things got better with open campus and frequent trips to Weston Road and Linden, and Dunkin Donuts.  By the time we started senior year, we all officially became victims of senioritis and anxiously awaited our graduation.

Throughout our journey through the Weston Public Schools, we grew not only physically, but academically and socially.  We learned to examine issues closely, learn about ourselves and our world, and accept our differences. And finally, we got to dip our feet a little into the ocean of adulthood. Although our journey has had many bumps along the way, we shared tragedies and triumphs together as a class.  From personal struggles and challenges, to the loss of family members, 2017 has remained united and strong as we persevered through the difficult moments and found resiliency on the other side.

As I think about the road that has lead us to 2017, I have realized how many people have impacted us in our educational experiences.  From the teachers who genuinely cared about us and our futures, to the staff who continuously greeted us with smiling faces each and every day, we have been lucky to have had this place as our home away from home.  While each step on our path to 2017 gave us a new stress to deal with, along with it came a huge group of supporters who were constantly in our corner, cheering us on when we succeeded and consoling us when we were defeated. We know that no matter where we go in the district, we will be able to find people who know us and love us for the people we are and the people we will become.

There are people here today that have been the foundation for our journey and we are all lucky to have parents who have raised us, stuck with us for so long, and who have not given up on us, even though I’m almost positive that you’ve been very tempted to do so (Hi dad). Thank you for holding our hand throughout this entire journey, and for slowly letting go, forcing us to gradually learn how to “adult” in this thing called life.  

To my METCO family, students and staff, thank you for always being there for me. We all know how hard it is to wake up an hour earlier than everyone else and make the 45 minute commute back and forth to Weston everyday. Thank you for making the bus rides something to look forward to, and for making it one of my favorite parts of the day. If I have didn’t have you all in my life, there would be no way that I’d be here today delivering this speech, nor walking across the stage.

And finally, to my beautiful class of 2017. Thank you for being you. It has been fun for me to graduate with the superlative  title of “Everyone’s Best Friend”. Thank you Class of 2017, for being my best friends, and for creating an environment for me to feel safe in. Thank you for allowing me to explore my talents, and for letting me express myself. I wouldn’t have wanted to take this journey with anyone else.

So in the future, when I think of the number seventeen, I won’t just think of that odd number smashed between 16 and 18.  Instead, I will think of the faces here in front of me.  The faces that include talented actors, artists and musicians, amazing athletes, and some of the smartest people I have ever known.  To me, seventeen will no longer be a number, but a state of mind, a connection that will continue to unite us all long after we leave the Weston bubble.  I want you all to know that I love you with all my heart and I wish nothing but success for each and every one of you in the years to come. Congratulations Class of 2017!

Hayden Hadley: Overnight

Sometimes it’s easy to forget, the moments that impact us the most. It’s easy to take them for granted, to let them pass by unrecognized, to forget the instance that made you smile on a day such as September 17th, 2013. 

You might not remember that day, but let me tell you, I sure as hell do. The 13th of September 2013 was the day of the speeches for the class of 2017 Student Council Representatives. I was sweating there under the lights of the black box, hoping that my fashion statement of socks and birkenstocks didn’t make me look too uncool, or that the gleaming blemish on my left temple didn’t distract the audience too much from my speech. I mention this memory not because I got elected in the end, or because I learned some valuable lesson about leadership, public speaking, or

I mention this memory not because I got elected in the end, or because I learned some valuable lesson about leadership, public speaking, or self-confidence, but because of the reactions I had from my classmates the block after. I remember walking up to the library for my English class, and the only thing I got was support. Never mind that fact that I made intangible promises of a smoothie bar in the cafeteria, no homework weekends every weekend, and open campus for freshman, I still was approached with only smiles and high fives.

And there was the first moment of epiphany I had for the true nature of our class of 2017, for it isn’t the academic success, the athletic talent, or the beautiful faces that fill our class that makes all administration admire us, but the positivity, the kindness, and the never fading smiles that we dish out to all that surround us. It’s funny how life brings us full circle, for here today I give a speech again in front of the class of 2017, a little nervous, most definitely sweating once again, but nevertheless feeling nothing but the radiance of the smiles of my fellow classmates and so many other teachers, school faculty, family and friends. I can’t even begin to tell you how grateful I am to have been part of this group of people. Yes it took me a long, busy, stressful four years full of elbow grease and sweat blood and tears, but hey, in the words of a film that we will one day show our kids, reminiscent of the good old days, life’s a climb, but the view is great. And with that fantastic Hannah Montana quote, I reveal another extraordinary quality of this group of students in front of me. These young adults have been lucky enough to be exposed to it all. We grew up in the midst of VCR’s, listening to tape players and outliving CD’s. We have watched everything from the fresh Prince of Belair, to Drake and Josh, and listened to everything from the Beatles to Chance. In many ways, this generation of millennials has been forced to adapt in the exponentially changing world. We have lived our high school years fusing the ideas of the past and the present. In many ways, we have been raised to be true leaders that can empathize with different cultures and ideas, because we have seen the true consequences of our booming world.

It’s funny how life brings us full circle, for here today I give a speech again in front of the class of 2017, a little nervous, most definitely sweating once again, but nevertheless feeling nothing but the radiance of the smiles of my fellow classmates and so many other teachers, school faculty, family and friends. I can’t even begin to tell you how grateful I am to have been part of this group of people. Yes it took me a long, busy, stressful four years full of elbow grease and sweat blood and tears, but hey, in the words of a film that we will one day show our kids, reminiscent of the good old days, life’s a climb, but the view is great. And with that fantastic Hannah Montana quote, I reveal another extraordinary quality of this group of students in front of me. These young adults have been lucky enough to be exposed to it all. We grew up in the midst of VCR’s, listening to tape players and outliving CD’s. We have watched everything from the fresh Prince of Belair, to Drake and Josh, and listened to everything from the Beatles to Chance. In many ways, this generation of millennials has been forced to adapt in the exponentially changing world. We have lived our high school years fusing the ideas of the past and the present. In many ways, we have been raised to be true leaders that can empathize with different cultures and ideas, because we have seen the true consequences of our booming world.

I can’t even begin to tell you how grateful I am to have been part of this group of people. Yes it took me a long, busy, stressful four years full of elbow grease and sweat blood and tears, but hey, in the words of a film that we will one day show our kids, reminiscent of the good old days, life’s a climb, but the view is great. And with that fantastic Hannah Montana quote, I reveal another extraordinary quality of this group of students in front of me. These young adults have been lucky enough to be exposed to it all. We grew up in the midst of VCR’s, listening to tape players and outliving CD’s. We have watched everything from the fresh Prince of Belair, to Drake and Josh, and listened to everything from the Beatles to Chance. In many ways, this generation of millennials has been forced to adapt in the exponentially changing world. We have lived our high school years fusing the ideas of the past and the present. In many ways, we have been raised to be true leaders that can empathize with different cultures and ideas, because we have seen the true consequences of our booming world.

We were alive for 9/11, Hurricane Katrina, the invention of Facebook, the election of our first African American president. With the inescapable media and a world full of controversy, we have seen a lot of very real and important things before we have even truly been able to define our personalities and opinions. These people before you have not grown up like generations that have come before us, but we have been lucky enough to grow up in a community like Weston, filled with role models and teachers that have taught us to dissect these events, learn from them, and give us the skills to move forward knowing that there will always be opportunities for us to take advantage of the gifts we have been given.Think back to the way that high school changed you. Whether you were brace faced, overwhelmed by the hallways of the labyrinth of 444 Wellesley street, or in love with jusin bieber, I can promise you that you’ve changed a lot. Some may say that high school is really insignificant in the grand scheme, but I feel that high school will be some of the densest years of our lives, filled with so much development of who we are and what we believe in. From ages 14 to 18 many of us had our first kisses, saw our first R-rated movie, got our drivers licenses. We got to feel the intense camaraderie of sports teams, of creating second families amongst groups of friends. We complained together over bouncing hot dogs in the cafeteria, laughed about strange slang words that only those our age could understand. If you really think about it, high school is a strange experience that we will never truly have again. For 720 days, we have been mushed together with kids our own age, any characteristic besides our age completely irrelevant to our location. People with different interests, different backgrounds, families, religions, beliefs, political views, fashions, ambitions, all jumbled up in the 8 day rotation we call high school. And this is where I get really sad to leave because I don’t want to lose the randomness of this situation. There are people that we have all seen for the past four years every single day, who impacted us, that we may never talk to again. And so I return back to my first point in this speech. That sometimes it’s easy to forget the moments that impact us the most. The reminiscence of my words and the mentioning of the people you may not see again after today is not supposed to make you upset, but to make you value the importance of the four-year adventure we just finished. We just grew together and empowered each other for four entire years to reach the point that we are at today. The smiles that we exchanged and the relationships that we created allow us to stand up tall and walk forward into our next adventure with all the confidence that there are good people in this world and that we can make an impact simply with our words and smiles. Four years of ups and downs, mishaps, victories, and adventure have all brought me to this new moment that I hope I never take for granted, this moment where I get to say, Congratulations Class of 2017, you did it. I wish you all the very very best. Thank you.

Think back to the way that high school changed you. Whether you were brace faced, overwhelmed by the hallways of the labyrinth of 444 Wellesley street, or in love with jusin bieber, I can promise you that you’ve changed a lot. Some may say that high school is really insignificant in the grand scheme, but I feel that high school will be some of the densest years of our lives, filled with so much development of who we are and what we believe in. From ages 14 to 18 many of us had our first kisses, saw our first R-rated movie, got our drivers licenses. We got to feel the intense camaraderie of sports teams, of creating second families amongst groups of friends. We complained together over bouncing hot dogs in the cafeteria, laughed about strange slang words that only those our age could understand. If you really think about it, high school is a strange experience that we will never truly have again. For 720 days, we have been mushed together with kids our own age, any characteristic besides our age completely irrelevant to our location. People with different interests, different backgrounds, families, religions, beliefs, political views, fashions, ambitions, all jumbled up in the 8 day rotation we call high school. And this is where I get really sad to leave because I don’t want to lose the randomness of this situation. There are people that we have all seen for the past four years every single day, who impacted us, that we may never talk to again. And so I return back to my first point in this speech. That sometimes it’s easy to forget the moments that impact us the most. The reminiscence of my words and the mentioning of the people you may not see again after today is not supposed to make you upset, but to make you value the importance of the four-year adventure we just finished. We just grew together and empowered each other for four entire years to reach the point that we are at today. The smiles that we exchanged and the relationships that we created allow us to stand up tall and walk forward into our next adventure with all the confidence that there are good people in this world and that we can make an impact simply with our words and smiles. Four years of ups and downs, mishaps, victories, and adventure have all brought me to this new moment that I hope I never take for granted, this moment where I get to say, Congratulations Class of 2017, you did it. I wish you all the very very best. Thank you.

If you really think about it, high school is a strange experience that we will never truly have again. For 720 days, we have been mushed together with kids our own age, any characteristic besides our age completely irrelevant to our location. People with different interests, different backgrounds, families, religions, beliefs, political views, fashions, ambitions, all jumbled up in the 8 day rotation we call high school. And this is where I get really sad to leave because I don’t want to lose the randomness of this situation. There are people that we have all seen for the past four years every single day, who impacted us, that we may never talk to again. And so I return back to my first point in this speech. That sometimes it’s easy to forget the moments that impact us the most. The reminiscence of my words and the mentioning of the people you may not see again after today is not supposed to make you upset, but to make you value the importance of the four-year adventure we just finished. We just grew together and empowered each other for four entire years to reach the point that we are at today. The smiles that we exchanged and the relationships that we created allow us to stand up tall and walk forward into our next adventure with all the confidence that there are good people in this world and that we can make an impact simply with our words and smiles. Four years of ups and downs, mishaps, victories, and adventure have all brought me to this new moment that I hope I never take for granted, this moment where I get to say, Congratulations Class of 2017, you did it. I wish you all the very very best. Thank you.

And this is where I get really sad to leave because I don’t want to lose the randomness of this situation. There are people that we have all seen for the past four years every single day, who impacted us, that we may never talk to again. And so I return back to my first point in this speech. That sometimes it’s easy to forget the moments that impact us the most. The reminiscence of my words and the mentioning of the people you may not see again after today is not supposed to make you upset, but to make you value the importance of the four-year adventure we just finished. We just grew together and empowered each other for four entire years to reach the point that we are at today. The smiles that we exchanged and the relationships that we created allow us to stand up tall and walk forward into our next adventure with all the confidence that there are good people in this world and that we can make an impact simply with our words and smiles. Four years of ups and downs, mishaps, victories, and adventure have all brought me to this new moment that I hope I never take for granted, this moment where I get to say, Congratulations Class of 2017, you did it. I wish you all the very very best. Thank you.

 

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